Polly Guerin, a NYC prominent writer & friend

SMILING MAY SAVE YOUR LIFE (c) By Polly Guerin

Smile Though Your Heart is Aching,
Light Up Your Face with Gladness” As the refrain laments, frequent
smiling may even lengthen your life. Yes, smiling can be good for your
health, but it has to come naturally or with practice become a daily
ritual. Why? Because a smile brings certain benefits; with each and
every broad smile you give to each day’s encounter your stress zone
calms down. What’s more, in social situations smiling is one of the
easiest ways to win over new acquaintances who will perceive your
personality as one who is friendly and open to conversation. When it
comes to greeting and meeting business associates a polite smile, even
in the board room, can give you the upper hand and open up the
discussion. A full smile uses the muscles around the mouth and eyes and
that is good news because the more you engage in a full smile and
happier you will be for it.

IT’S HARD TO SMILE FEELING BLUE
yet, with practice you can conjure up a smile and feel the clouds of
sadness or melancholia soften and disappear. However, you have to evoke a
genuine full smile to get full benefits. The face like any other part
of the body is made up of bones, blood vessels, connective tissue, fat,
nerves and voluntary muscles (twenty-six). If the muscles of the body
can be brought back to tone, so can the muscles of the face and by the
same means: smiling and exercise. Of course, positive thinking is
another factor that can be reflected in your face. One expert claims
that blowing up balloons and making faces can tone the face. For
starters, try on a full smile, commonly referred to as a Duchenne smile,
after the 19th century French neurologist who first described it, which
activates major muscles around the eyes and mouth.

WHO WROTE THE LYRICS?
Most people are surprised to learn that the music to this favorite was
written by the legendary silent film star Charlie Chaplin, whose “Little
Tramp” character is one of the all time enduring images of the silent
film era. DA Jack Hayford, editor of the popular music reference
website, Events-in-Music said, “Chaplin wrote the theme music for his
silent film, Modern Times, released in 1936. But the song did not become
known as “Smile” until lyrics were added by John Turner and Geoffrey
Parsons in 1954. It took off and reached the #10 spot on the Billboard
charts the same year when it was recorded by Nat King Cole. “Smile” has
been recorded and released countless times, including Tony
Bennett/Barbra Streisand collaboration on Bennett’s 2006 Duets album.”

SO
LIGHTEN UP YOUR FACE WITH GLADNESS. REMEMBER PEOPLE WHO SMILE MORE NOT
ONLY UPLIFT THEIR LIFE WITH GREATER HAPPINESS THEIR SMILE TENDS TO HAVE A
REAL POSITIVE IMPACT ON OTHER PEOPLE.

 

Polly Guerin
PollyTalk From New York
www.pollytalk.com

Leo Buscaglia about smiling

This is from his book, Bus 9 to Paradise.
(love the title!)
“Smiles are such a simple yet telling act. There are some people who seem to think a smile is a major investment in human relations. They seem to be saying that a smile is risky business indeed, considering that it might not be returned or be misunderstood.
Still, there is an interesting dynamic at work when two strangers encounter one another. Often one or the other briefly struggles with the decision of whether or not to dare a smile. It seems a rather pointless dilemma when one considers the possible consequences: He/She may not reciprocate. So what? you did what was natural for you and so did the other person. It doesn’t take too much effort since more effort is involved when one frowns. Also, there is a 50-50 chance that your smile will be returned. In this case, two people have become just a little less like strangers, a little less alone.”